The Minor in Entrepreneurship helps students in any school and major at CUA apply entrepreneurship theory, discipline, and principles to real-world challenges and opportunities. Entrepreneurship is often equated to starting new businesses, but you needn't want to own a business to benefit from the program. In any field of study, entrepreneurial skills help individuals move from ideas to impact: seizing possibilities, solving problems, transforming communities large or small — and making a transformative difference in your field.

At the Ciocca Center for Principled Entrepreneurship we see entrepreneurship as a reflection of the nature of the human person who is made in the image of God: the human person is co-creator, both inside and outside of the business realm. We hold an integral vision of entrepreneurship, one that centers on the human person as the source of social change in the world.

"Principled Entrepreneurship" serves the integral development of the human person and is a key building block of a free and virtuous society. Whether your dream is serving others through business innovation, reducing illiteracy, spurring economic development in poor communities, or putting your gifts and career at the service of your family and community, a foundation in entrepreneurship complements your passion and learning with valuable tools that will help you “think like an owner” and be the change you wish to see in the world.

For Busch School students, the required courses for the Minor include two courses focusing on the essence of entrepreneurship, that is, on theory, empirical evidence, and history (ENT 372 and 476); and two other courses that dive deep into case studies and practice (ENT 472 and 491). For more information, please contact Dr. Frederic Sautet, the director of the Entrepreneurship Minor.

Courses

To earn a minor in Entrepreneurship, undergraduate students must take six courses, for a total of eighteen credits, including the four required courses listed below and two electives (with two separate tracks for Busch and non-Busch students). Non-Busch School students may select two courses from the list of electives; or they may have the flexibility, with approval from the Entrepreneurship Faculty, to select alternative classes that will enhance their entrepreneurial abilities as applied to their major or desired field of work.

Track for Busch School Students: 

 


Required Courses:

ENT/MGT 372: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

ENT/MGT 472: Principled Entrepreneurship

ENT/SRES 476: The Spirit of Entrepreneurial Capitalism

ENT 491: Small Business Growth Lab A

 

Elective Courses (choose two):

ENT 491: Small Business Growth Lab B

ENT/MGT 301: Ethics in Business and Economics

ENT/MGT 310: Leadership & Organization

ENT/MKT 422: Consultative Professional Sales

ENGR 420: Social Innovation Startups I (can be taken alone or with ENGR 421)

ENGR 421: Social Innovation Startups II

Track for non-Busch School Students:

 


Required Courses:

ENT/MGT 118: The Vocation of Business

ENT/MGT 372: Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital

ENT/MGT 472: Principled Entrepreneurship

ENT 491: Small Business Growth Lab A

 

Elective Courses (choose two):

ENT 491: Small Business Growth Lab B

ENT/SRES 476: The Spirit of Entrepreneurial Capitalism

ENT/MGT 301: Ethics in Business and Economics

ENT/MGT 310: Leadership & Organization

ENT/MKT 422: Consultative Professional Sales

ENGR 420: Social Innovation Startups I (can be taken alone or with ENGR 421)

ENGR 421: Social Innovation Startups II

Course Descriptions

  1. Required Courses for Busch School and Non-Busch School Tracks

Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital (ENT/MGT 372) provides the tools to understand the phenomenon of entrepreneurship in all its facets, including in the marketplace and in non-profit settings. All students, including finance, marketing or management majors, will gain a strong understanding of entrepreneurship. Topics include entrepreneurship and the organization, culture, psychology, institutions, public policy, politics, strategic entrepreneurship, monastic entrepreneurship, and ethics. Among other things, this course provides students with the tools to think about the source of development, growth and social change; why advertising and marketing may be crucial to the functioning of the marketplace; and the role of venture capital and angel investing in the US economy. Course taught by Dr. Frederic Sautet.

Principled Entrepreneurship (ENT/MGT 472) teaches what entrepreneurship is in practice through the extensive case study. Students learn how to create “good profit” through principled entrepreneurship. They explore entrepreneurship theories like Market Based Management (MBM), Long-Term Sustainable Value Creation (LTSVC), The Business Model Canvas, and The Lean Startup. Using the case method, it involves several class projects. Throughout the semester, students will meet successful entrepreneurs and have a chance to interact with them to learn about what they found useful during their careers. Course taught by Prof. Andreas Widmer.

The Spirit of Entrepreneurial Capitalism (ENT/SRES 476) is a course on the political economy of entrepreneurial capitalism. The economic history of the West can be interpreted as a history of the spirit of entrepreneurial capitalism. That history is the interaction among: (a) public and private institutions that enabled production and trade, (b) entrepreneurs and business organizations, and (c) an ecology which includes Christianity and its culture of reciprocity and rights, virtues, excellence, and other mechanisms enabling respect for promises made. This course provides an analysis of the history of entrepreneurial capitalism emphasizing these three intertwined aspects. Course taught by Dr. Frederic Sautet.

Small Business Growth Lab A (ENT/MGT 491) gives students practical experience through a semester-long immersion with small and medium-size local businesses to analyze their situations, markets and opportunities; communicate with various stakeholders; and implement business strategy. Live case-studies and consulting projects form the core curriculum and vary by semester. This class is a practicum, and can be taken in the fall (A) and/or the spring (B) semesters. Course taught by Prof. Brian Becker.

The Vocation of Business (ENT/MGT 118) is a required course for all non-Busch School students. This course is an introduction to business and entrepreneurship through the lens of personal vocation. Students discover how business can be a noble calling, and a path to sanctifying the world, for those called. Students learn the basics of running a business while uncovering who they are called to be and how best to develop their unique talents, grow in virtue, and apply these interests and aptitudes to a career. We explore these topics through lectures and a variety of projects, including each student launching their own online business during the course of the semester. Course taught by Prof. Luke Burgis and Prof. Andreas Widmer. 

  1. Elective Courses for Busch School and Non-Busch School Tracks

Small Business Growth Lab B (ENT/MGT 491) provides either an introduction to or continuation of the semester-long immersion as described in 491 A. Open to students in the spring semester regardless of whether or not they experienced 491 A in the fall. When taken as a year-long course (A and B), it counts towards the entire electives (6 credits). Course taught by Prof. Brian Becker.

Business & Economics Ethics (ENT/ MGT 301) develops a comprehensive view of the spirit animating leaders capable of making a deep, positive, and lasting impact on persons, firms and society through professionalism, integrity, and a spirit of service. Its focus is on character and culture. Thus, it examines from a recent historical perspective relevant personal virtues—especially prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude—and social principles—especially human dignity, the common good, solidarity, and subsidiarity. It draws implications for the application of these virtues and principles through discussion of specific, complex and multi-faceted ethical and social issues in business. Course taught by Dr. Max Torres.

Leadership & Organization (ENT/MGT 310) covers leadership theory and the process of leading in both the private and the public sectors. Relates the leadership function to organizational development. Covers topics such as managers versus leaders, managing from a global perspective, ethical dilemmas in leadership, gender and leadership, and leading through empowerment. Course taught by Prof. Jack Yoest. 

Consultative Professional Sales (ENT/MKT 422) provides an in-depth examination of the fundamentals of professional sales and sales management. The course covers the techniques of selling products and services in retail, business-to-consumer, and business-to-business markets. Course topics include the development of selling as a discipline, selling philosophies, sales relationship strategies, product strategies, customer strategies, competitive strategies, sales presentations, sales management, account management, sales force automation, and theories of sales techniques. Course taught by Prof. Mark Weber.

Social Innovation Startups (ENGR 420 / ENGR 523 / SOC 421) is a 3 credit, semester-long course provided by the School of Engineering. The 3 credit semester-long follow-up course (ENGR 421 / ENGR 524) may also be taken, for a total of 6 credits. It is for seniors or graduate students. This course provides students with a framework for identification of socially relevant problems, and the creation of sustainable and scalable solutions to those problems. This is an intensive, project-based course with small, multi-disciplinary teams. Teams conceive, develop, and test creative technological solutions to real-world problems. The course introduces students to Design Thinking and Ethics Guided Design, and makes use of the Lean Startup curriculum, including use of the business model canvas, customer development, and agile engineering. Teams are given a toolkit for innovation and exposed to a wide range of frameworks for managing and driving innovation. Instructor permission is required to enroll. Course taught by Dr. Chris Danek.

Register for the Minor

All interested students should arrange an interview with Entrepreneurship Faculty in The Busch School for permission. Email teti@cua.edu with "Entrepreneurship Minor" in the subject line to make an appointment. Once permission has been granted:

  • Busch school students wishing to declare an Entrepreneurship Minor should tell the Advising Office and use this form to register.
  • Students from other schools (Arts & Sciences, Engineering, Nursing, etc.) should request the minor through their respective Dean's offices, with the approval of their own academic advisors.